Treating Neuropathy and Nerve Painthe Feet

Let me start with I'm a diabetic. I developedneuropathy, which basically you lose all sensationthe feet, but it's over a period of time.It was very painful. I would have sensationsmy feet like I was standing on fire, walkingon glass. Last October it got so bad that I couldn't sleep at night. Then I met Bullard, because he's just a great physician. I wouldn't think twice, I'd recommendhim to anybody. Very compassionate, very thorough, I can't say enough about Bullard. He'sjust a great physician and I don't know if there's anything he couldn't do hecould probably move mountains if he wanted to!Glen, probably one of the biggest questions

people are asking you is what'd we do, what'shappened. Of course, you had a tremendous improvementyour pain and the tinglingand the numbness. Easiest explanation is, to tell everybody, that this big nerve here,which is on the inside part of your left foot, was getting strangled. There was a noose aroundit. What we did is we wentand loosened the noose, and that allows that nerve to beginto function and work like it's supposed to.Now, the sensation is coming back, it's something that's going to take time butI can feel more. My quality of life has greatly improved since I had the procedure done by Bullard. There's no other physician

that I would recommend.Glen,the next couple weeks, what we're going to do is make sure that the swellingis improving, hopefully begin to transition you out of your compression socks, becauseI know it's kind of hot right now, and then look at making sure that your shoe gear andthings like that are where they're supposed to be, fitting you well, protecting your feetand stuff. Ok? Very good. Thank you, I appreciate it, havea good weekend! You do the same. Alright, see ya.

What Are The Different Types Of Vitamins For Diabetics Diabetes Supplements Vitamins

What are the Different Types of Vitamins forDiabetics? Nutritionists and the medical community appearto agree that consumption of whole foods — served as balanced meals and snacks — provide allof the nutrients the diabetic needs. There are exceptions to this rule, and pregnantwomen, diabetics on a lowcalorie diet, and vegans might consider an intake of extra vitamins. Vitamins for diabetics are also helpful forthose with food allergies, kidney disease, some elderly individuals, and people whosegastrointestinal system fails to absorb the proper level of essential nutrients.

It is thought that vitamin D supplements mightpossibly help a diabetic better control his blood sugar levels. This is not astonishing news, as vitamin Dis relatively uncommonfood; nondiabetics are also urged to increase vitamin D intake. Diabetics and nondiabetics can both feelsafe taking a vitamin D supplement of 800 to 1,000 International Units (IU) per day. Vitamin C, might be physically disadvantageousfor diabetic women. It can be taken, but the maximum daily dosageshould not exceed 300 mg per day, Vitamin

B6 should never be taken by a diabetic individual,due to its effect on blood sugar levels. The verdict is till out on vitamin E, as wellas on mineral supplements such as chromium and magnesium. Research concerning vitamins for diabeticsis sometimes contradictory, but the general consensus is that supplements are not requiredexceptpatients with special dietary needs or specific medical conditions. Safe vitamins for diabetics are consideredthose takenvery small doses; the amounts should not exceed 150 percent of the recommendeddaily allowance.

Further, supplements containing iron shouldbe avoided by men and postmenopausal women. A single daily multivitamin or mineral supplementis likely the safest route for a diabetic who wishes to integrate a supplement intohis treatment and health maintenance plan.