Treating Neuropathy and Nerve Painthe Feet

Let me start with I'm a diabetic. I developedneuropathy, which basically you lose all sensationthe feet, but it's over a period of time.It was very painful. I would have sensationsmy feet like I was standing on fire, walkingon glass. Last October it got so bad that I couldn't sleep at night. Then I met Bullard, because he's just a great physician. I wouldn't think twice, I'd recommendhim to anybody. Very compassionate, very thorough, I can't say enough about Bullard. He'sjust a great physician and I don't know if there's anything he couldn't do hecould probably move mountains if he wanted to!Glen, probably one of the biggest questions

people are asking you is what'd we do, what'shappened. Of course, you had a tremendous improvementyour pain and the tinglingand the numbness. Easiest explanation is, to tell everybody, that this big nerve here,which is on the inside part of your left foot, was getting strangled. There was a noose aroundit. What we did is we wentand loosened the noose, and that allows that nerve to beginto function and work like it's supposed to.Now, the sensation is coming back, it's something that's going to take time butI can feel more. My quality of life has greatly improved since I had the procedure done by Bullard. There's no other physician

that I would recommend.Glen,the next couple weeks, what we're going to do is make sure that the swellingis improving, hopefully begin to transition you out of your compression socks, becauseI know it's kind of hot right now, and then look at making sure that your shoe gear andthings like that are where they're supposed to be, fitting you well, protecting your feetand stuff. Ok? Very good. Thank you, I appreciate it, havea good weekend! You do the same. Alright, see ya.

Gene regulatory interactions mediating formation of neural crest stem cells

MARIANNE BRONNER RECEIVEDHER DEGREE AT JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY IN BIOPHYSICS AND I HAVE KNOWN HER SINCE SHE WAS A GRADUATE STUDENT THERE. THEN SHE BECAME AN ASSISTANT PROFESSOR AT UCIRVINE, AND AFTER 16 YEARS IN UCIRVINE AND RISING UP TO BECOME FULL

PROFESSOR, SHE THEN MOVED TO CAL TECH IN 1996, AND BECAME THE CHAIR OF THE FACULTY AT CAL TECH, AND SHE WAS THE FIRST WOMAN TO HOLD THAT POSITION, AND SHE HELD THAT POSITION FOR TWO YEARS. SO DR. BRONNER HAS DONE SEMINAL

WORK IN THE FIELD OF DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY, AND HER LAB HAS HAD A LONG STANDING INTEREST IN NEURAL CRESTLINEAGE SPECIFICATION, MIGRATION AND DIFFERENTIATION, EARLY WORK PIONEERED THE USE OF SINGLE CELL LINEAGE LABELING APPROACHING FOR

CREST CELLS IN VIVO AND SHOWING THE CELLS ARE MULTIPOTENT. SHE THEN WENT ON TO DEFINE SEVERAL OF THE SIGNALS UNDERLYING THE INDUCTION SUCH AS SEGMENTAL MIGRATION AND RECENTLY HER LAB EXPLOITED THIS KNOWLEDGE WITH SYSTEMS LEVEL

TRANSCRIPTIONAL PROFILING, GENOMIC ANALYSIS AND IN VIVO PERTURBATION EXPERIMENTS TO REVEAL CONNECTIONS RESPONSIBLE FOR NEURAL CREST FORMATION, EVOLUTIONARY ORIGIN. HER WORK LED TO THE UNDERSTANDING OF A NUMBER OF

BIRTH DEFECTS RELATED TO NEURAL CREST DEVELOPMENT SUCH AS AUTONOMIC NEUROPATHY AND CRANIOFACIAL DEFECT AND HAS PUBLISHED MORE THAN 300 PAPERS IN TOP JOURNALS, SHE'S THE EDITOR IN CHIEF OF DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY, AND ON THE EDITORIAL

ATTR Amyloidosis Behind The Mystery

MUSICIt's a rare disease impacting the lives of several thousandAmericans. And while the overall U.S. population effected by itis small, for the families dealing with this condition theimpliions are large, indeed. Part 2 of our continuing serieson hereditary ATTR continues. Christopher Cox reports fromBoston. It's rare, debilitating, and it's a fatal disease thatrunsfamilies with no known cure. It's name: Hereditary ATTRAmyloidosis. We're here in

Boston on the banks of thehistoric Charles River to meet with 2 very special women. Womenimpacted by this disease. To hear their stories and theirhopes, and how it's impacting them, their lives, and theirfamilies. The day after I turned 44, I got my feet out of bed andI noticed, as I put my feet on the floor, that my feet began totingle, as if they had fallen asleep, and I thought, oh, thiswill just go away. And throughout the day it did not,and I tried to dismiss it. I did

a lot of walking and I had badshoes, and 3 days later the tingling startedmy hands.And I remember calling Christina and we had been talking and Isaid, you know, I think this may have started. And said you'dbetter get to the now. Dawn and Christina knew whatthose symptoms meant. Bloodlines for this disease run deepthefamily. Very close third cousins represent the fifth generation.Christina's 2 siblings, are also positive for the genemutation. You're both familiar

with the family genealogy chart.Has that graphic been helpful for you bothunderstandingand communiing the disease? For me, it's it's something Ican also take to the s as proof that this isn't somethingto be dismissed. This is something that occurs everygeneration, and the 5050 chance that this recessive gene playsitself out, justevery generation. And for mepersonally, it seemed like every 10 years someoneour familyis effected, and you know, dies.

And it wasn't until Christina'sside of the family, where it was your dad and your aunt, thatthere was more hope they caught it so early. That there was achance of life and it wasn't a death sentence. So for me, thechart, it's kinda hard to see so many generations effected and somany families and, but yet a little bit hopeful to see thatwithin these generations people are starting to live. There arenew treatment options. Things are happening for us. ATTR is,of course, a familial disease

that afflicts through thegenerations. Patients and their family members become familiarwith the symptoms. And younger patients that experience thedisease are familiar with those symptoms leading to an earlierapproach to s and an earlier diagnosis. Dawn, youtested positive for the disease nearly a decade before symptomsbegan showing up. Tell us about that. The genetic confirmationshows that there might be the luck of the aw. It's a 5050chance of developing the