Peripheral Neuropathy Numb Feet and Hands Symptoms Resolved TheVillagesNeuropathy

When you had originally presented to the office,you presented with chronic numbness, tingling, burning,the hands and the feet. It limitedyour ability to walk, limited your ability to sleep, your ability to relax. We've completeda course of treatment here with the Davis neuropathy program, how have you done withthe treatment and how are you feeling today? I feel wonderful. I have to tell you thatthe treatment, I was on both programs. Before I came in, all that I knew that I had wasperipheral neuropathy after your exam, after you examined me. We found out that I had alsospinal stenosismy spine. I have followed your program, both of your programs, the DRSprogram and the peripheral neuropathy program,

and I am doing beautifully. I can now walkwithout assistance which I was having to hold my husband's hand or somebody's hand whenI was shopping or doing anything. I could not ive by myself. I feel like a whole personnow. Well congratulations on your results and we're very proud to have you here as apatient. What else would you like to have me tell you? If you have another questionI could certainly, I would like to tell a little bit about your people that you haveworking for you. They are wonderful, young, professional people. I don't know what kindof a program you put them on, but I love each and every one of them. They're an asset toyour office. Well thank you so much for the

kind words and we look forward to seeing youagain soon. You're welcome.

PreDiabetic Peripheral Neuropathy Randall Gates Power Health Talk

Hello, I am Randall Gates. I am a chiropractor,as well as being a board certified chiropractic neurologist. We work with patients who have have peripheralneuropathy on a very common basis. It's actually the majority of our case load. What we areseeing is that,our al practice certain neuropathy patients can be helped. So lets pause there. You are watching thisbecause you likely know something about prediabetes and peripheral neuropathy. You may know morethan what your s know about this condition. I'm not saying thata denigration fashion.It's just that this is a relatively new finding

and we will get to that. So what is peripheral neuropathy? Peripheralneuropathy is basically where patients commonly have numbness, tingling and or burning intheir feet, maybe spreading up to their knees and maybe involving their hands. Yes, thereare many other kinds of peripheral neuropathy but they're not what we are commonly talkingabout here. So for those with blood sugar disorders, we'veknown for a long period of time that diabetes causes peripheral neuropathy. The currentstatistics estimate that for those withperipheral neuropathy, diabetes counts for half of that.In our al experience many types of patients

with peripheral neuropathy are told it's yourdiabetes half the time or we don't know the cause the other half of the time. We can runlots of lab tests but we are not going to figure it out. You just have to go home andlive with it because there is really nothing we can do for you anyway. Those are commonly the accounts patients getfrom their medical peripheral neuropathy or their medical general practitioner. Whilethat may have been true some time ago, a new research is coming out that patients withperipheral neuropathy can be helped. So I'm just going to stop there.

So now lets go into prediabetes. The literaturestarted coming out late 1990s early 2000s. This prediabetic peripheral neuropathy hasreally been discovered by two gentlemen out of the Universtiy of Utah, Gordon Smithand Robinson Singleton. These are two neurologists from the University of Utah,which is a specialty center, where they started showing that prediabetes can cause peripheral neuropathy. We thought diabetes counts for half of peripheralneuropathy patientsAmerica. They are now showing that prediabetes can account fora significant percentage. This statistic varies from 10% but I've seen it as high as 30%,which I think is a little too high. Prediabetes

can account for a significant percentage ofthose cases of idopathic peripheral neuropathy or cryptogenic peripheral neuropathies, whichbasically means we don't know the cause of it. So we are now seeing that prediabetescan cause peripheral neuropathy. How does it do that? Well, when someone hasprediabetes,essence what happens is that they have periods where their blood sugargoes too high. It is not too high all the time as is commonly the casean unmanagedcase of diabetes. So let's say you go have your feast of pasta and bread, you go to anice Italian dinner, and if you are moving into a prediabetic state there is a possibilitythat you just cant make enough insulin to

get that sugar into yourself. So insulin takessugar from our blood stream and puts it into our muscle cells or our fat cells. Soessence,prediabetes you eat thathigh carbohyate meal and sugar goes a little too high. When that sugar goes a little toohigh, there are three tissuesthe body that can't get sugar out of them. The retina,the kidney and peripheral nerves and nerve tissue basically. If you can't get sugar out,the problem is that sugar gets converted into a substance that attracts water. So now thosewith prediabetes, we are seeing that they can pull water into the nerves. That can causethe nerves to start to dysfunction.