Peripheral Neuropathy Lyme Disease Treatment

Treating Numbness Tingling and Burning Caused by Neuropathy

My name is David Northcutt. I'm oneof the podiatrists here at Dallas Podiatry Works. Today I want to discuss diabetic peripheralneuropathy. There are several reasons for the development of peripheral neuropathy,but diabetic peripheral neuropathy is one of the most common. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy simply meansnerve damage that is caused from having diabetes. This is not something that develops rapidly,but is a slowly worsening and progressive condition which happens over the period ofseveral years. The loss of sensation that occurs with nerve damage from diabetes makesthe patient more prone to developing open

sores or ulcers. Patients often do not know that they havea sore or wound, due to this lack of sensation. This can lead to significant complicationsincluding amputations. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy usually occurs in patients whodo not maintain their blood sugar well, however it can occur in anyone with diabetes. The symptoms of neuropathy include numbness,tingling, pain, burning in the feet which can progress up to the legs, there's oftenloss of muscle tone, loss of balance, and changes to foot structure. To determine whetheryou have diabetic peripheral neuropathy, a

history and physical will be performed. Simple,in office, noninvasive testing helps to diagnose the problem. Neurologic tests sometimes areordered. Sometimes a biopsy of the peripheral nerves in the skin may also be performed.Treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy begins with good control of your blood sugar.There are oral medications as well as topical medications that may reduce your symptoms.Prevention of diabetic peripheral neuropathy includes maintaining good blood sugar levels. If you have any symptoms of numbness, burning,tingling in your feet or legs, please give us a call at Dallas Podiatry Works. We willwork to get the correct diagnosis to help

relieve your symptoms.

Safe and effective natural control of Lyme Disease

Do you know what the most undiagnosedcommon vector borne illnesses in the USA and Europe? You may be surprised: it's Lyme diseasealso called Borreliosis. If you are a hiker, gardener or live close to the woods or meadows you need to be especially alert, as this disease leads to a variety of complications. Lyme disease is transmitted by ticks which feed on mammals, birds and reptiles.

If these animals are infected with a bacterium called Borrrelia than an infected tick can inject it into the blood of other animals or humans by biting their skin. When Borrelia is in the blood it is disseminated all over the body. Our first line of defense is to watch for ticks on you and your pet and quickly remove them. Unfortunately Lyme disease is often diagnosed much later after a person has already developed flulike symptoms, rash or swollen areas of the body. If not treated it can cause arthritis or damage the brain and other organs.

Borrelia is very tricky and difficult to eliminate because it has many ways to survive in the body and resists our immune system, nutrient deprivation or even antibiotic treatments. Feeling threatened by these factors converted from the spiral looking form to the latent rounded form, in more extreme hostile conditions these bacteria will aggregate and cover themselves in an extracellular substance that becomes a highly difficult to penetrate structure called biofilm. Many patients think the treatment with antibiotics will help them to recover completely.

Unfortunately in many the disease reoccur shortly after withdrawing the antibiotics and the bacterial resistance appears. There are no known effective natural nontoxic treatments to Lyme diseases although many desperate patients look for them. The cellular health approach developed at the Rath Institute has been based on specifically selected micronutrients working in a synergistic way which can simultaneously target bacteria and their pathological effects . This direction opens up a new possibility for safe and effective control of Lyme disease, bringing hope

for millions of patients.

PreDiabetic Peripheral Neuropathy Randall Gates Power Health Talk

Hello, I am Randall Gates. I am a chiropractor,as well as being a board certified chiropractic neurologist. We work with patients who have have peripheralneuropathy on a very common basis. It's actually the majority of our case load. What we areseeing is that, in our al practice certain neuropathy patients can be helped. So lets pause there. You are watching thisbecause you likely know something about prediabetes and peripheral neuropathy. You may know morethan what your s know about this condition. I'm not saying that in a denigration fashion.It's just that this is a relatively new finding

and we will get to that. So what is peripheral neuropathy? Peripheralneuropathy is basically where patients commonly have numbness, tingling and or burning intheir feet, maybe spreading up to their knees and maybe involving their hands. Yes, thereare many other kinds of peripheral neuropathy but they're not what we are commonly talkingabout here. So for those with blood sugar disorders, we'veknown for a long period of time that diabetes causes peripheral neuropathy. The currentstatistics estimate that for those withperipheral neuropathy, diabetes counts for half of that.In our al experience many types of patients

with peripheral neuropathy are told it's yourdiabetes half the time or we don't know the cause the other half of the time. We can runlots of lab tests but we are not going to figure it out. You just have to go home andlive with it because there is really nothing we can do for you anyway. Those are commonly the accounts patients getfrom their medical peripheral neuropathy or their medical general practitioner. Whilethat may have been true some time ago, a new research is coming out that patients withperipheral neuropathy can be helped. So I'm just going to stop there.

So now lets go into prediabetes. The literaturestarted coming out late 1990s early 2000s. This prediabetic peripheral neuropathy hasreally been discovered by two gentlemen out of the Universtiy of Utah, Gordon Smithand Robinson Singleton. These are two neurologists from the University of Utah,which is a specialty center, where they started showing that prediabetes can cause peripheral neuropathy. We thought diabetes counts for half of peripheralneuropathy patients in America. They are now showing that prediabetes can account fora significant percentage. This statistic varies from 10% but I've seen it as high as 30%,which I think is a little too high. Prediabetes

can account for a significant percentage ofthose cases of idopathic peripheral neuropathy or cryptogenic peripheral neuropathies, whichbasically means we don't know the cause of it. So we are now seeing that prediabetescan cause peripheral neuropathy. How does it do that? Well, when someone hasprediabetes, in essence what happens is that they have periods where their blood sugargoes too high. It is not too high all the time as is commonly the case in an unmanagedcase of diabetes. So let's say you go have your feast of pasta and bread, you go to anice Italian dinner, and if you are moving into a prediabetic state there is a possibilitythat you just cant make enough insulin to

get that sugar into yourself. So insulin takessugar from our blood stream and puts it into our muscle cells or our fat cells. So in essence, in prediabetes you eat thathigh carbohydrate meal and sugar goes a little too high. When that sugar goes a little toohigh, there are three tissues in the body that can't get sugar out of them. The retina,the kidney and peripheral nerves and nerve tissue basically. If you can't get sugar out,the problem is that sugar gets converted into a substance that attracts water. So now thosewith prediabetes, we are seeing that they can pull water into the nerves. That can causethe nerves to start to dysfunction.

Category: Neuropathic Pain

Leave a Reply