Peripheral Neuropathy And Diabetic Foot Ulcer

Levaquin Peripheral Neuropathy

ATTENTION HAVE YOU TAKEN THE DRUG LEVAQUIN? IF SO, PLEASE, LISTEN TO THIS IMPORTANT MESSAGE. Millions of lives have been saved becauseof the discovery of antibiotics. Fluoroquinolones are a type of powerful antibiotic which havebeen used to treat serious and lifethreatening bacterial infections. These fluoroquinolonesinclude the antibiotic ug, Levaquin. However, Levaquin has often been prescribedfor less serious ailments, such as sinus infections or ear infections, as well as other problemsthat could be treated with antibiotics that aren't quite as potent. This has resultedin many people developing Levaquin peripheral

neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy occurs when the nervesthat carry information from the brain to the central nervous system have become damaged.This resultsa variety of symptoms and many people have become disabled due to theuse of these antibiotics. Some of these symptoms include: Shooting painBurning or tingling sensation Lack of coordination and muscle weaknessDigestive issues DizzinessLightheadedness

Changesblood pressureVision problems Sweating or intolerance to heat In 2013, the FDA required ug makers to listperipheral neuropathy as a side effect. This came 12 years after the connection had alreadybeen made. Levaquin nerve damage can resultpermanentdisability and rob a victim of their ability to work. A number of lawsuits have alreadybeen filed, all of which claim the companies failed to provide patients with adequate warningsabout their association with peripheral neuropathy. If you or someone you know has taken Avelox,Cipro or Levaquin and developed any burning,

tingling, numbness of the legs and or arms,or were diagnosed with peripheral neuropathy, you may be entitled to compensation. Howevertime is limited to file a claim. For a free, no obligation case , callthe experienced law office of Bernstein Liebhard toll free at 18889882'9. That's 18889882'9. Again to learn more about your rights today,and for the compensation you deserve, call the law office of Bernstein Liebhard at 18889882'9.

CLEAR A Patients Guide to Understanding Offloading Diabetic Foot Ulcers

The purpose of this tutorial is to help you understandthe importance of offloading, the use of special footwear, and helping your foot ulcer healas quickly as possible. Healing quickly can reduce your risk of developing serious compliions.Key elements of successful healing are: rest, eat a balanced diet and maintain your bloodsugarsa controlled range, wear the device your tells you to wear at all times,and refraining from smoking. Foot ulcers need restorder to heal. If you were to breakyour leg, your would tell you not to walk on it. It is the same with your footulcer. We rest ulcers by taking off the load, or offloading the ulcer using special casts,boots, or shoes.

The possible compliions from a foot ulcer that fails to heal are: development of an infection,infection spreading to the rest of the body, resultingization, amputation atthe foot or leg, or even death. Foot ulcers put you at considerable risk for amputation.Amputation of part of your foot or leg can lead to changesyour ability to do activitiesthat are part of your everyday life. It can lead to a decreaseactivity, which canweaken your heart and body, making it difficult to control your diabetes. It can also changethe way you walk or move, potentially causing

damage to your other foot and leg. Most importantly,the challenge of having an amputation can lead to depression and sadness, affectinghow you are able to enjoy your family, friends, and hobbies. Normally, your body's responseto pain is a sharp reflex that allows you to recoil and prevent further injury. Diabetescauses changes to the nervesyour feet, and the ability to feel or sense pain. Itrobs your body of the protective gift of pain, or the ability to protect itself. This conditionis called neuropathy. People with neuropathy can walk with a stonetheir shoe and notnotice it. This could cause an ulcer or blister on their foot. A person with neuropathy doesnot know that they have a sore or blister

on their foot because they cannot feel it.By the time you notice the ulcer, it can become very serious. This is why it is importantto check your feet every day for problems. Diabetes can cause the skin on your feet tobecome very y, creating cracks that later become sores or infections. Ask a torecommend a good moisturizer for your feet and heels. People with diabetes can also havechangestheir leg and foot circulation. This reduces the oxygen, nutrients, and bloodsupply to your leg, increasing your risk of getting an ulcer and slowing your abilityto heal. Your may order a test to examine your circulation. Because of these factors,simple everyday activities such as walking

or standing on your injured foot can be harmfulto your healing ulcers. It could worsen the condition or cause infection. If you smoke,it is important that you talk to your about treatments to stop smoking. Smokingis a large reason why people develop circulation problemstheir legs and feet. Continuingsmoking will slow healing to your ulcer and likely make your circulation worse. The bestway to heal your diabetic ulcers is to take off the load by using special casts, boots,or shoes. It is important to wear these all the time, even if you are only taking a fewsteps. The best way to heal a diabetic foot ulcer is to use a special cast called a totalcontact cast. Research shows that more people

treated with total contact casts heal thanwith other treatments. These include bioengineered tissues, such as growth factors or syntheticskin substitutes, and negative pressure wound therapy. They also heal faster than with manyof the newer advanced woundhealing technologies. People treated with total contact casts healin an average of 42 days. gt;gt; DOCTOR: Next I'm going to make this irremovableby adding on a layer of cohesive bandages. s can also adapt your diabetic walking boot so that you cannot take it off. Thishas been shown to be just as effective as a total contact cast. Your may usea combination of wound and offloading treatments

Category: Diabetic Neuropathy

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