Peripheral Nerve Injury Treatment

Treating Numbness Tingling and Burning Caused by Neuropathy

My name is David Northcutt. I'm oneof the podiatrists here at Dallas Podiatry Works. Today I want to discuss diabetic peripheralneuropathy. There are several reasons for the development of peripheral neuropathy,but diabetic peripheral neuropathy is one of the most common. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy simply meansnerve damage that is caused from having diabetes. This is not something that develops rapidly,but is a slowly worsening and progressive condition which happens over the period ofseveral years. The loss of sensation that occurs with nerve damage from diabetes makesthe patient more prone to developing open

sores or ulcers. Patients often do not know that they havea sore or wound, due to this lack of sensation. This can lead to significant complicationsincluding amputations. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy usually occurs in patients whodo not maintain their blood sugar well, however it can occur in anyone with diabetes. The symptoms of neuropathy include numbness,tingling, pain, burning in the feet which can progress up to the legs, there's oftenloss of muscle tone, loss of balance, and changes to foot structure. To determine whetheryou have diabetic peripheral neuropathy, a

history and physical will be performed. Simple,in office, noninvasive testing helps to diagnose the problem. Neurologic tests sometimes areordered. Sometimes a biopsy of the peripheral nerves in the skin may also be performed.Treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy begins with good control of your blood sugar.There are oral medications as well as topical medications that may reduce your symptoms.Prevention of diabetic peripheral neuropathy includes maintaining good blood sugar levels. If you have any symptoms of numbness, burning,tingling in your feet or legs, please give us a call at Dallas Podiatry Works. We willwork to get the correct diagnosis to help

relieve your symptoms.

Seeing Pain New approach to diagnosing and treating nerve damage Chris McCurdy TEDxUM

When I was a young childI lost my favorite uncle to alcohol abuse. It made me wonder why does this happen? How can someone be consumed by a substance that's around us all the time? So, I made it my life's missionto become a drug expert, and I went to pharmacy school. I went to pharmacy schoolto understand what it is about drugs

that can make us heal or can hurt us. When I was in pharmacy school, I found out I fell in lovewith the research. Not only did I fall in lovewith the research I fell in love with this passionto educate others. And so, knowing that,I had to move forward. I had to move forward with my education so that I could carry those thingsout of my future;

and I went on and earned a atein medicinal chemistry; that's drug design not designer drugs. (Laughter) That enabled me to move forward and really pursue some of the basisof drug abuse and addiction. Here I am now, a professorof medicinal chemistry and pharmacology. And I've dedicated my careerto solving problems in drug abuse and actually findingbetter pain medications

because after all, painis the most common reason that individuals seek medical care. It's also the most common reason that we end upwith drug abuse and addiction. Moving from there, I've been ableto establish a laboratory here, at the University of Mississippi, where we've done a lotof groundbreaking work that I'll get to in a little bit to move us forward in those endeavors.

Now, how many people here have had to seek medical treatment that resulted in pain prescription? Yes, most all of us. How many of you ended up getting something like morphine, or codeine,or Hydrocodone, or Oxycontin? Yeah. Any of you had to take that for more than 2 or 3 weeks,maybe a month, maybe a couple?

If so, there's a high likelihoodyour body became physically dependent. So why does that mean? What do we mean when we talkabout physical dependence and drug abuse? Let's define these thingsa little more clearly. So drug abuse is simply the concept that you take a drug out of the contextthat it was prescribed. So, every now and then,all of us are guilty of taking a little more ibuprofen,or something, than it says on the bottle.

Treating Neuropathy and Nerve Pain in the Feet

Let me start with I'm a diabetic. I developedneuropathy, which basically you lose all sensation in the feet, but it's over a period of time.It was very painful. I would have sensations in my feet like I was standing on fire, walkingon glass. Last October it got so bad that I couldn't sleep at night. Then I met Bullard, because he's just a great physician. I wouldn't think twice, I'd recommendhim to anybody. Very compassionate, very thorough, I can't say enough about Bullard. He'sjust a great physician and I don't know if there's anything he couldn't do hecould probably move mountains if he wanted to!Glen, probably one of the biggest questions

people are asking you is what'd we do, what'shappened. Of course, you had a tremendous improvement in your pain and the tinglingand the numbness. Easiest explanation is, to tell everybody, that this big nerve here,which is on the inside part of your left foot, was getting strangled. There was a noose aroundit. What we did is we went in and loosened the noose, and that allows that nerve to beginto function and work like it's supposed to.Now, the sensation is coming back, it's something that's going to take time butI can feel more. My quality of life has greatly improved since I had the procedure done by Bullard. There's no other physician

that I would recommend.Glen, in the next couple weeks, what we're going to do is make sure that the swellingis improving, hopefully begin to transition you out of your compression socks, becauseI know it's kind of hot right now, and then look at making sure that your shoe gear andthings like that are where they're supposed to be, fitting you well, protecting your feetand stuff. Ok? Very good. Thank you, I appreciate it, havea good weekend! You do the same. Alright, see ya.

Category: Neuropathic Pain

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