Idiopathic Peripheral Neuropathy Hcc

Treating Neuropathy and Nerve Pain in the Feet

Let me start with I'm a diabetic. I developedneuropathy, which basically you lose all sensation in the feet, but it's over a period of time.It was very painful. I would have sensations in my feet like I was standing on fire, walkingon glass. Last October it got so bad that I couldn't sleep at night. Then I met Bullard, because he's just a great physician. I wouldn't think twice, I'd recommendhim to anybody. Very compassionate, very thorough, I can't say enough about Bullard. He'sjust a great physician and I don't know if there's anything he couldn't do hecould probably move mountains if he wanted to!Glen, probably one of the biggest questions

people are asking you is what'd we do, what'shappened. Of course, you had a tremendous improvement in your pain and the tinglingand the numbness. Easiest explanation is, to tell everybody, that this big nerve here,which is on the inside part of your left foot, was getting strangled. There was a noose aroundit. What we did is we went in and loosened the noose, and that allows that nerve to beginto function and work like it's supposed to.Now, the sensation is coming back, it's something that's going to take time butI can feel more. My quality of life has greatly improved since I had the procedure done by Bullard. There's no other physician

that I would recommend.Glen, in the next couple weeks, what we're going to do is make sure that the swellingis improving, hopefully begin to transition you out of your compression socks, becauseI know it's kind of hot right now, and then look at making sure that your shoe gear andthings like that are where they're supposed to be, fitting you well, protecting your feetand stuff. Ok? Very good. Thank you, I appreciate it, havea good weekend! You do the same. Alright, see ya.

ICD10 Coding and Diabetes

Welcome to CMS eHealth. By October 1, 2015, the new ICDcoding system will be in place for both diagnosesand inpatient procedures. Using ICD10, s willcapture much more information, meaning they can betterunderstand important details about a patient's healththan with ICD9. The new codes reflecthow health care has changed over the past 30 years with manyadvances in al practice.

You'll notice updates,including definition changes, terminology changes,and a lot more specifics. The most obvious change is thatthe code structure has expanded. While the old codes havethree to five characters, the new codes have up to seven, allowing for more detaileddescriptions. The first three charactersrepresent the category of disease or health condition,followed by a decimal point.

The fourth, fifth,and sixth characters represent al details,such as the cause of the disease, its severity,and its anatomical location. Let's look at how this all worksusing the example of diabetes. ICD9 has two major categoriesof diabetes codes, diabetes and secondary diabetes, but ICD10 separates Type 1diabetes from Type 2 diabetes. ICD10 also eliminates the broadcategory of secondary diabetes,

instead offeringsecondary options, such as underlyingconditions or causes. To capture more details,subcategories can be added to represent both complicationsand affected body systems. For example, the diabetessubcategories include ketoacidosis,kidney complications, ophthalmic complications,neurological complications, and circulatory complications.

Let's say a patient has diabetesdue to an underlying condition. That's code E08,followed by a decimal point. Next come the detailsin the form of subcategories, starting with the fourth digit. Ketoacidosis, for example,has a fourth digit of 1. To add even more detail,a fifth digit of zero is ketoacidosis without coma, and a fifth digit of oneis ketoacidosis with coma.

These subcategoriesstay the same, no matter what type of diabetesis being described. For example, diagnosis code .621 describes the complicationof foot ulcer. So E10.621 is type 1 diabeteswith foot ulcer, and E11.621 is type 2 diabeteswith foot ulcer. In this example,the provider has documented the category of diabetesand the complications.

Category: Neuropathic Pain

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