Central Vs Peripheral Nerve Damage

Peripheral Neuropathy Symptoms Relieved Davis

When you originally presented to the officeyou presented with very very intense peripheral neuropathy painthe lower legs and feet.How have you been responding to our peripheral neuropathy treatments, and how do you feeltoday? Today I feel real good, when I first started i couldn't feel a thing under thebottom of my feet. I couldn't feel the car, now I can walk on my car at home and ifthere are any crumbs I can feel those and find them. Before I couldn't feel them. Asfar as my legs go I had it felt like there were thousands of needles jabbing them. Nowthat is gone and I have a little pain oncea while but nothing like before. I can,I have little unbalances still walking, but

otherwise I feel 100% better than I did whenI camehere. Well congratulations on your results and we're very proud to have you hereas a patient. Oh well I'm glad you could do something for me. Thank you.

Why Cant We Reverse Nerve Damage

Every year, tens of millions of Americanssuffer from nerve damage, some irreparably so. Science can heal bones, grow new organsand even restore our microbiomes, but why is it so hard to fix our nerves? Hey guys Lissette here for DNews The human body posses a remarkable abilityto heal. Bones refuse, skin wounds mend, and the immune system adapts to infection,after infection. But there's one area of the body that struggles to recover after aninjury: The nervous system. Nerve damage can be some of the most debilitating and permanenttype of injury.

The nervous system is an incredibly complexnetwork used to send electrical information throughout your body. It can basically bedivided into two sections. With the brain and spinal cord making up the central nervoussystem or CNS…. and the nerves made up of fibers of sensory and motor neurons comprisingthe peripheral nervous system. Each cellthe nervous system from the tipof your finger up your arm, up your spinal column, into your brain, is very specialized.And each has a unique function on the pathway, like a circuit. If one these gets cut or injured,it's hard for an exact replacement cell to be putin the right spot. Think aboutwhen you get a cut on your skin. If the cut

goes deep enough, exact replicas of cellswon't cover the wound, instead fibrous tissues form. which we call scars. And scars arepart of the problemregrowing nerves, they often getthe way especiallythe caseof spinal cord injuries. As part of the CNS, spinal cord injuries are notoriously difficultto heal; partially because of the way nerve cellsthe CNS are made. According to the book, “Results and Problemsin Cell Differentiation�, the CNS also has certain proteins that weirdly, inhibit cellregeneration. While this might sound like a bad idea, it's hugely beneficial overallto the formation of the CNS. These cells need

to grow exactly where they are supposed to,just one out of place could be bad. Like. think of an electrical circuit, each unithas to bea specific orderspecific place to work. If one is out of place, theintegrity of the CNS is compromised. Neuronsthe CNS also lack certain cleaningcells. Nerve cells are made up of many parts, but they send signals through threads coveredin a protective sheet of myelin. These threads are called axons. Axons are the long partof the cell that reaches out to the cell next to it to send information down the line.Like arms handing the bucket down the linea bucket brigade. So these are obviouslysuper important and need protecting. That's

where the Schwann cells come in. which areonly foundthe Peripheral nervous system. Schwann cells, which aren't neurons butGLEEL cells, produce the myelin that help protect the axons. But, a study publishedin The Journal of Cell Biology found they also clean up damaged nerves making wayfor the healing process to take place and new nerves to be formed. But the problem is.these Schwann cells are missing from the CNS. What they have instead are myelin producingcells called oligodenocytes. But these cells don't clean up damaged nerve cells at all.Which is part of the problem. So unfortunately, according to RichardG. Fessler professor at Rush University Medical

Center quot;There are currently no therapies whichsuccessfully reverse the damagequot; from injuries to the spinal cord. But research is currentlyunderway to examine the potential success of stem cell treatment, where stem cells areinjected directly at the injury site. Still, it will take a few years to see the resultsof such trials. But there are times your body can regeneratenerves. The peripheral nervous system doesn't have the same blocking proteins that the CNShas, and Schwann cells help heal the damage. So it's able to regrow nerves, albeit slowly.For instance, if you cut a nerve into your shoulder, it could take a year to regrow.By that time.the musclesyour arms could

Peripheral Nervous System Crash Course AP 12

When it comes to the nervous system, or justyour bodygeneral, let's face it: your brain gets all the props. And it deserves those props! It's a complied,and crucial, and sometimes crazy boss of an organ. But your brain would be pretty useless withouta support team that kept it connected to the outside world. Because frankly, like any leader, the moreisolated your brain gets, the weirder it gets. Put a persona watery, pitchblack sensorydeprivation tank, and you'll see the brain do some really weird stuff. Without a constantflood of external information, the brain starts

to confuse its own thoughts for actual experiences,leading you to hallucinate the taste of cheeseburgers, or the sound of a choir singing, or the sightof pink stampeding elephants. It's your peripheral nervous system thatkeeps things real, by putting your braintouch with the physical environment around you,and allowing it to respond. This network snakes through just about every part of your body,providing the central nervous system with information ranging from the temperature, to the touchof a hand on your shoulder, to a twisted ankle. The peripheral nervous system's sensorynerve receptors spy on the world for the central nervous system, and each type responds todifferent kinds of stimuli.

Thermoreceptors respond to changestemperature.photoreceptors react to light, chemoreceptors pay attention to chemicals, and mechanoreceptorsrespond to pressure, touch, and vibration. And then we've got specialized nerve receptorscalled nociceptors that, unlike those other receptors, fire only to indie pain, whichis the main thing I want to talk about today. Because, as unpleasant as a stickthe eyeor tackthe foot may be, pain is actually a great example of where everything we've talkedabout over the last few weeks all comes together, as we trace a pain signal through your nervoussystem, from the first cuss to the Hello Kitty band aid. By the end of this episode of Crash CourseAnatomy Physiology you'll never think

of a stubbed toe, pounding headache, or burnedtongue the same way again. Most people go to great lengths to avoid pain,but really, it's an incredibly useful sensation, because it helps protect us from ourselves,and from the outside world. If you're feeling physical pain, it probablymeans that your body is under stress, damaged, ordanger, and your nervous system is sendinga cease and desist signal to stop twisting your arm like that, or to back away from that bonfire,or please seek medical attention, like, RIGHT NOW. Sothat way, pain is actually good foryou that's why it exists. I'm not saying it's pleasant, but if you've ever wishedfor an XMenlike power to be impervious to

pain, I've gotta say, that is one foolishmonkey's paw of a wish. Just ask Ashlyn Blocker. She's got a geneticmutation that's given her a total insensitivity to any kind of pain. And as a result, she'sabsentmindedly dunked her handspots of boiling water, run around for days without noticingbroken bones, and nearly chewed off her own tongue. Luckily, such congenital conditions are veryrare. The rest of us have a whole nervous system dedied to making sure our bodies react witha predictable chain of events at the first sign of damage. Like say you just wake up and you're extraordinarilyhungry for some reason, so you run downstairs to grab some clam chowder, but you didn't putany shoes on and suddenly you're like, “YOWW!�

There's a tack, fell out of the wall, andyou stepped right on it of course. Your foot immediately lifts off the ground,and then you're assuring your that you're not yelling at her, you're just yelling,and then you limp over to the couch, and sit down, and you pull up your foot, and removethat spiny devil from your flesh. You want to talk physiology? So what exactlyjust happenedyour body? Well, the first step was a changeyourenvironment that is, a stimulus that activated some of your sensory receptors. In this case, it was a change from the probablycompletely ignored feeling of bare skin on

Category: Diabetic Neuropathy

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